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A Visit to Salem Witch Museum, Boston

Salem is a coastal city located in Essex County, Massachusetts. It was settled in 1626 and is one of the important seaports in American History. Salem is a residential and tourist area that is home to the House of Seven Gables, Salem State University, Pioneer Village, the Salem Maritime National Historic Site, Salem Willows Park, and the Peabody Essex Museum. It features historic residential neighbourhoods in the Federal Street District and the Charter Street Historic District.

One of the city’s cultural identities is via their location of Salem Witch Trials. Here you can notice Police cards adorned with witch logo, elementary school is known as Witchcraft Heights etc. It is believed that Gallows hill located here is a site for many public hangings which is currently used for playing various field sports. People who know about Salem will know about Salem Witch Trials which were a series of hearing and prosecutions of people accused of Witchcraft which took place between February 1692 to May 1693.  More than 200 people were accused, 19 of whom were found guilty and executed by hanging (14 women and 5 men). One other man, Giles Corey, was crushed to death for refusing to plead, and at least five people died in jail. It was the deadliest witch hunt in the history of colonial North America.

Perhaps you can notice how these were conducted during the 17th century is by visiting Salem Witch Museum.

Salem Witch Museum is located in North Salem and is known to be one of the most visited Museum in Salem. It is open all year round from 10:00 – 17:00 and in July August it is open from 10:00 – 19:00, the same will be open at different times in the month of October which is the month of Halloween in the USA. The tickets are priced at 13USD for Adults, 11.50USD for senior citizens and 10USD for children. You can mail them for Group tours and discounts.

History goes on that In January of 1692, the daughter and niece of Reverend Samuel Parris of Salem Village became ill. When they failed to get cured by the local village doctor, William Griggs was called in. His diagnosis of bewitchment put into motion the forces that would ultimately result in the death by hanging of 19 men and women. In addition, 1 man was crushed to death; 7 others died in prison.

To understand the events of the Salem witch trials, it is necessary to examine the times in which accusations of witchcraft occurred. There were the ordinary stresses of 17th-century life in the Massachusetts Bay Colony. A strong belief in the devil, factions among Salem Village fanatics and rivalry with nearby Salem Town, a recent smallpox epidemic and the threat of attack by warring tribes created a fertile ground for fear and suspicion. Soon prisons were filled with more than 150 men and women from towns surrounding Salem. All would await trial for a crime punishable by death due to their practice of Witchcraft.

Later in June 1692, the court was set up in Salem to hear the case of witchcraft, the ones found guilty were hanged down over three successive days after Bridget Bishop of Salem was hanged on June 10th due to possession of WitchCraft. And once again, a special court was set up to hear the case and then the case was disbanded by Governor William Phipps. Many years have been passed and apologies were offered for victim’s family.

Here at Salem Witch Museum, you will be on a guided tour and there will be a show showcasing how Witchcraft made people believe that they are doing harm to society and also how the people who practised Witchcrafts were punished by hanging etc.  As this is one of the most complex cases and one of America’s most brutal happening you can notice how people believed in superstition and killed people due to this.

One of the most visited place in Salem, one travelling to Massachusetts should try to take time to visit this museum to know how witch has been a part of the city of Salem.

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MacroTraveller

"Macro means Big & Traveller is one who travels for Experiences, Not Destinations, "Experiential Journey of a Macro Guy" Follow me on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram #MacroTraveller

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