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Things you shouldn’t miss in Jaipur | #MacroTraveller

If you want to know what to see in Jaipur, you just have to read this article in which we talk about the visiting places to see in Jaipur, and they are a must. Jaipur, the frenetic capital of Rajasthan in India with almost three million inhabitants, is one of the vertices of the great Triangle tour of North India (Delhi-Agra-Jaipur) and hosts within the walls of its historic center and its Outskirts a very impressive historical-artistic heritage.

Princely “Pink City” of the Maharajas Rajputs, a Hindu caste of proud warriors and dynasty almost as old as time, is the best planned and urbanised city in the country, full and long avenues runs a string and was designed in the first Half of the XVIII by Raja Jai ​​Singh II.

Jaipur is the gateway to Rajasthan, and the traveler will visit in it a set of palaces, temples and forts that are among the best of the state. Most attractive has for a traveler. Not only for its palaces and temples or for the pink color that unifies the facades of its buildings. Also because it is a city full of life and energy, with a historic center for which you fancy wandering to get lost for its numerous bazaars.

Here are the places you should not miss if you visit Jaipur:

Hawa Mahal – Palace of the Winds!

It is the icon of Jaipur. Hawa Mahal is an icon of Rajasthani architecture and a challenge for the photographer looking for originality. It is one of the facades of the royal palace to which the Maharaja Sawai Pratap Singh ordered to add in 1799 more than 900 windows so that their queens and concubines could peer into the street and see what real life was like, beyond the seraglio of a palace.

City Palace – Home of Rajputs!

Royal Residence since the 18th century and opened to the public since 1959, is a palatial complex masterfully conceived of Mughal, Rajput and European style buildings including palaces, pavilions, courtyards, courtrooms, temples and a museum displaying a rich collection of art, Ancient weapons, handicrafts, musical instruments, floats, photographs and court dress directly linked to the history of the royal family. The visit of the ensemble supposes an evocative immersion in the rich and sophisticated world of the Rajput nobility.

It is the least interesting in my opinion. Inside still lives, the royal family of Rajasthan, who to pay the expenses maintains a part open to the public. Everything is more expensive!

Fort Amer!

The most emblematic construction of the city. Only the view of its walls reflected in the lake at dawn justifies the stay in Jaipur. For 900 rupees you can climb to the elephant access door. Inside all the magnificence that surrounds the Maharaja of Rajasthan is preserved. The elephant ride offers a skyline view of the Pink city and a mesmerizing sight over Maotha Lake.

Govind Dev Ji Temple!

The main temple of Jaipur dedicated to Krishna, the incarnation of Visnu who represents love, is in the old city and celebrates at around 6:30 p.m. the principal of the prayers of the day. The ceremony is open to all interested parties, provided they disembark to enter and do not wear any leather garment. The faithful sing and pray as a monk moves a torch around the figure of God and later blesses them with water.

Albert Hall!

Built to commemorate Albert’s visit to India, Prince of Wales in 1876, it is a gigantic building that mixes both Indian and British art. Located next to Ram Niwas’s large garden, this building of excellent and very colonial Indo-Saracenic architecture from the late 19th century houses the state museum of Rajasthan, which exhibits an estimable and very varied collection of artworks, archaeological objects and traditional items. Today it houses the Central Museum, large rooms full of all kinds of junk, from period costumes to carpets. Recommended only if you are very interested in museums.

Minaret Iswari Swarga Sal!

A tower 35 meters high, very close to the City Palace from the top of which has excellent panoramic views of the Pink City and its mottled historic center. The interesting aspect in Iswari Minar Swarga Sal however, is the fact that one can always count on enjoying a good sunset atop with pigeons, mainas and all sorts of birds flocking at a height in the minaret and the view of the lanes and bylanes is distinct from here.

Man Sagar Lake!

Man Sagar Lake is an artificial lake, situated in Jaipur, the capital of the state of Rajasthan in India. It is an artificial lake named after Raja Man Singh, the then ruler of Amber. It is on the outskirts of the town, on the way to Fort Amber. It is worth going at sunset, as the local people do, to walk along the promenade that borders the shore, enjoy the good temperature and watch the sun go down on the Jal Mehel Palace, built in the middle of the lake and which many confuse with The Palace of Lake of Udaipur.

Solar Observatory!

It is one of the oldest solar observatories that exist in India (dates from 1728) and is still in use. It serves both to know the time and the season to predict the future. Avoid going at noon; A sun of justice falls, and there is not a single shadow.

Visit Chaura Rasta / Badi Chopar!

They are the two main streets of the old city and the most crowded and full of life and bazaars. They cross at the door Tripolia, access to the Royal Palace. It is worth wandering through them both by day and by night when Mughal restaurants (grilled meat) are filled with lights, smoke and aromas.

Go Shopping!

Jaipur is the city of bazaars. The streets of the historic center are a gigantic open market until dusk where you can buy everything. There are markets specialized in jewellery, saris and fabrics, slippers and perfumes, etc. Those who are in the most central streets (Chaura Rasta / Badi Chopar) are more touristy and expensive, of course. You must bargain there.

 

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"Macro means Big & Traveller is one who travels for Experiences, Not Destinations, "Experiential Journey of a Macro Guy" Follow me on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram #MacroTraveller

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